child development, Child's Education, family time, momblog, Relationships

The Positive Influence of Being Involved in your Child’s Education + Free Printable Spring Worksheet

It has been shown many times over in research studies that a parent who is involved in their child’s education has a positive impact. It’s reflected in improved grades and test scores, strong attendance, a higher rate of homework completion, higher graduation rates, improved attitudes and behaviors in the child, as well as the child being more likely to become involved in positive extra-curricular activities. Send out the message early in your child’s education that your home is an involved and active supporter of their learning.

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Probably the most important element of a positive learning environment at home is structure. But what is too little or too much?  If we’re too lenient or expect too little, your child may become disorganized or unmotivated. If we’re too rigid and strict, it can cause undue pressure or cause your child to feel unable to deliver on your expectations.

So what’s the best way to meet in the middle and create a positive learning environment for your child at home?  

Help your child develop a work area where they can study and focus without being interrupted. Children usually do better when they have a private study area away from interruption. If your child prefers doing their work at the kitchen table, make sure other family members understand the kitchen is off-limits during study time.  Make sure your child has plenty of supplies and reference materials available and that the area has plenty of light. Regardless of its location, ensure the area is quiet and that your child can study and work uninterrupted.

adorable-little-girl-with-glasses-getting-stressed-out_53876-63179Agree on a regular time for studying. To help your child make homework a habit, schedule a set time each day for homework. Perhaps breaking study time up into smaller increments would work better for your child than one solid period. Work with your child to find out what works best for them. In addition, be sure your child has a sufficient break between the time they arrive home from school before they sit down to work in order to ‘decompress’ from their school day.

 

Help your child develop a method of keeping track of homework assignments. This can be a difficult chore for some students. Developing a successful way of keeping track of assignments then scratching them off as completed helps them develop a productive method for accomplishing tasks later in life.

Develop a positive line of communication with your child’s teacher.  Teachers are usually very willing and excited to work with an involved parent to help the child’s overall success in school.  Whether it’s notes sent back and forth in your child’s backpack or an e-mail correspondence, make sure your teacher knows your open for suggestions as how to better assist them in the homework and study process at home.


You can download free printable spring matching worksheet here

matching list with images_spring

You can also download worksheet answers here 

Restore your little learner’s passion for the outdoors with this spring-themed learning sheet. For more fun and engaging educational reading activities, go to Education.com!


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Child's Education, family time, momblog, Relationships

Get Involved in your Child’s Activities, Hobbies and School

via Get Involved in your Child’s Activities, Hobbies and School

How-To-Strengthen-Parent-child-Relationship

It’s probably no secret that children who have involved parents are more happy, healthy, and well-adjusted and excel at their educational and extracurricular pursuits.  It can increase their cognitive development, keeps them motivated, strengthens the parent-child relationship, and has a direct positive influence on their overall academic achievement.  In turn, it can also help parents achieve a positive outlook on their parenting, increase their own self confidence and self esteem, and will most likely feel more satisfied with their child’s educational experience at school.

But where do you get involved?  

With today’s busy schedules between home, work, and school, it may feel that the average family has very little quality time to offer.  However, different options and levels of commitment are available to fit every parent’s availability, and with some careful planning and dedication, you can make it a positive experience for both yourself and your child.

First of all, discover what your child is most passionate about.  Maybe you’ve thought about volunteering for the school bake sale to raise money, but your child is actually more actively involved in her local Girl Scouts troop.   If that’s the case, then get together with the other Girl Scout parents and see what you can contribute to help the troop.  Maybe you could organize a bake sale to benefit their next summer outing.

family-time

It’s also important to consider what skills, talents and abilities you can bring to the table.  Maybe your child’s school is in desperate need of your help organizing a fundraiser, but your skills in sewing and designing might better serve the school if you were to help in making the costumes for the school play.  Remember, you want this to be a positive experience for both of you, and if your child senses that you’re not happy with what you’ve chosen to become involved in, then they likely will not be happy as well.

But the bottom line is get involved and stay involved.  Children of involved parents are less likely to get into mischief, have emotional problems, or have problems in school. 

You benefit by connecting with and staying connected to your child.  It’s a win-win situation for you both.


how to be the most loving parent the smart way

 

 

Get a  book by the author Bakshi Sidhu

child development, Child's Education, Uncategorised

EFFECTIVE TIPS TO GET YOUR CHILD PRESCHOOL-READY

For more than two years, your child could have been solely under your care. She may be used to just staying at home either alone with her toys or playing with her siblings. But you must know that she cannot stay at home forever. She has to explore the world and start learning about broader possibilities. So how do you prepare your child for preschool?

Here are some of the most effective tips to let your child become physically, emotionally, and mentally ready for preschool:

          1. Talk to your child about the need for preschool

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Communication is the key to healthy relationships. Even when your child seems to be so young for serious talks, you should still make an effort to explain to her that going to preschool is necessary. Give her ideas about how exciting preschool could be. Describe to her the fun of meeting new friends, singing nursery rhymes, and playing outside.

           2. Use the preschool concept during pretend play

You surely know how children love pretend play activities. If you are running out of new ideas for your pretend play at home, then it is now the time to consider having a preschool pretend play concept. You could first act out as the teacher and your child as a student. The roles could interchange every day depending on your goals.

Set up a preschool corner at home that is equipped with a study table, chair, puzzle mat, coloring materials, and more. Make sure that your pretend play will have a similar schedule to the preschool format. There must be a designated time for singing, circle time, story-telling, snack time, and free play.

          3. Read books about school

When you go to the bookstore, you can choose the books that are about school or where the story’s setting is in the school. This can stimulate the interest in school in your child’s mind. It is also a creative way of giving her a subconscious idea about how children should behave in school.

           4. Visit the preschool.

Anything that is strange can stress out a child. You do not want your child to feel worried because of a new environment. It would be wonderful if you can frequently bring your little one to the preschool a few weeks before the actual start of the school year. Talk to the management if you can let her play for a few minutes at the yard or if you could just spend some time roaming around.

          5. Schedule playdates with other children.

102350253 Girls Playing on Playdate

If your kid isn’t used to spending time with other children, then you have to introduce the idea of a social group to her. You could speak with other moms in your circle of friends or in your neighborhood to have a series of playdates among children. Carefully plan out the activities for your playdate so that every moment during the session can be a meaningful opportunity for learning and growth.

           6. Meet the teacher.

The teachers of your child will be her second parents while in school. Your little one must feel comfortable with her teachers and even with the other personnel of the school. Schedule a meeting with the teacher where she can speak with you and your child. During the meeting, you must be able to relay all the necessary information about your child such as her behavioral nuances and medical condition.

Going to preschool is another milestone for your child. Be sure to make the process as fun as possible. Use all your creativity and exercise your patience during this transition.


 

the quicker_ better way to get your child potty trainedGet a  book by the author Bakshi Sidhu

Child's Education

The Positive Influence of Being Involved in your Child’s Education

 

It has been shown many times over in research studies that a parent who is involved in their child’s education has a positive impact. It’s reflected in improved grades and test scores, strong attendance, a higher rate of homework completion, higher graduation rates, improved attitudes and behaviors in the child, as well as the child being more likely to become involved in positive extra-curricular activities. Send out the message early in your child’s education that your home is an involved and active supporter of their learning.

Probably the most important element of a positive learning environment at home is structure. But what is too little or too much?  If we’re too lenient or expect too little, your child may become disorganized or unmotivated. If we’re too rigid and strict, it can cause undue pressure or cause your child to feel unable to deliver on your expectations.  

So what’s the best way to meet in the middle and create a positive learning environment for your child at home?  

mom helping kid to do homework

Help your child develop a work area where they can study and focus without being interrupted. Children usually do better when they have a private study area away from interruption. If your child prefers doing their work at the kitchen table, make sure other family members understand the kitchen is off-limits during study time.  Make sure your child has plenty of supplies and reference materials available and that the area has plenty of light. Regardless of its location, ensure the area is quiet and that your child can study and work uninterrupted.

Agree on a regular time for studying. To help your child make homework a habit, schedule a set time each day for homework. Perhaps breaking study time up into smaller increments would work better for your child than one solid period. Work with your child to find out what works best for them. In addition, be sure your child has a sufficient break between the time they arrive home from school before they sit down to work in order to ‘decompress’ from their school day.

Help your child develop a method of keeping track of homework assignments. This can be a difficult chore for some students. Developing a successful way of keeping track of assignments then scratching them off as completed helps them develop a productive method for accomplishing tasks later in life.

Develop a positive line of communication with your child’s teacher.  Teachers are usually very willing and excited to work with an involved parent to help the child’s overall success in school.  Whether it’s notes sent back and forth in your child’s backpack or an e-mail correspondence, make sure your teacher knows your open for suggestions as how to better assist them in the homework and study process at home.