child development, Child's Education, Relationships

Is Your Toddler Ready for Responsibilities?

When is your child ready to take on any responsibility? When is she old enough to have a particular task?

Responsibility is a good virtue to pass onto our children. It is something that they could learn not just in theory but also in practice. We cannot always just speak with them about do’s and don’ts without letting them do what they are supposed to do and avoid what they should not be doing.

But why should you teach them responsibility?

1. Responsibility is a virtue.

As a virtue, responsibility will give your child a foundation for dealing with other people and her environment. It will allow her to understand that the world does not revolve around her but that she must contribute something to make the world, or even just your house, a better place.

2. Responsibility secures their future.

If you are deeply concerned about the career path of your child in the future, then better instill responsibility early on. Although responsibility in itself won’t directly offer a response to what your child should be taking as a college course or what job to pursue, it will give her a definite advantage to secure a bright and wonderful future.

Once your child learns about responsibility, there is no need to nag her about finishing her homework. Once she understands that the world does not revolve around her, she will be more considerate of other people in the workplace. Once she becomes responsible, she can stand independently and traverse the road to success.

3. Responsibility corrects unwanted behavior.

Learning about responsibility in theory and practice can cause a fascinating transformation in the attitude of your child.

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I know how tempting it is to give her all the comfort in life and to shield her from all harm. But at some point in child’s life, difficulties and challenges will be inevitable. A well-grounded child could have a better chance for survival than a spoiled child in the real world.

How do you know if your child is ready for responsibilities?

There is no definite timetable for teaching responsibilities. Even babies can make a sense out of this world simply by observing.

If you want to teach your toddler about responsibility, then show her what it means. It is by seeing your daily behavior that she can learn most.

Here are some of the daily household chores that your toddler can do according to her age:

  • Putting Toys Away

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Scattered toys are almost always a problem for most parents. Why don’t you solve this problem by making it as a fun activity?

Have a nursery rhyme for packing away the toys. Replace the lyrics with words that mean what you want to happen. You will be surprised how organized your house can be once your toddler learns about this skill.

  • Putting Clothes in the Hamper

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Folding clothes and dropping them in a hanger can also take up much of your time. Instead of whining over your pile of clothes, get the help from your toddler by asking her to put some of the clothes in the hanger. She would surely love this task!

 

  • Wiping Dirt from Her Face

The responsibility to oneself is a critical value that a person must learn. Hygiene can easily be taught once your child reaches the toddler stage.

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One simple task that you can give your toddler is wiping her face during meal times. Let her know that dirt must not stay on her face.

  • Piling Up Books

Do you love reading to your child? Then give your toddler the responsibility to keep the books orderly. It could also develop her motor skills, actually!

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Teaching responsibility to your toddler is super fun. Just be creative in your ways and you are surely on your way to having a truly responsible child with a great chance for success in the future!


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child development, child safety, family conflict, Relationships

The Importance of Crystal-Clear Rules for your Child

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The world is a far more scary and complicated place than it was when you were a child.  As a result, it’s imperative that you set adequate yet fair boundaries with your child.  It’s a very important role in your parenting responsibilities. Children must make difficult decisions each day, and if they don’t have clear, firm boundaries set, they may not always make the wisest choice. Limits teach children proper restraint in social and individual activities and provide children with necessary structure and security to assist in healthy development. Setting limits also provide children with guidance before they have an opportunity to get into trouble, thus making them more successful with everyday life.

A child’s age and developmental level needs to be considered when setting limits. All children have a need for independence and individualization; however, they also need structure, security and parental involvement.

It goes without saying that the needs of a 2-year old vary greatly than those of a teenager. A toddler has a strong desire to explore and investigate, but parameters need to be set to ensure their safety while doing so. Teenagers need to be able to be an individual and be independent, but with strong parental guidance and influence, are more likely to make smart choices in difficult situations.

Limits should be discussed and set prior to the situation. Though situations arise that weren’t planned on, daily situations should have set limits and expectations. A teenager who breaks curfew may have the privilege of going out with friends revoked until they learn respect for the rules.  A child who misbehaves while playing with a friend may need to be separated from the fun until they can learn to properly behave.

Children respond in a positive manner in an environment in which they know what to expect and what is excepted of them. A child will be more respectful towards rules and more willing to abide by them if the rules are clear and consistent. 

Additionally, it’s crucial that once a limit is set that they caregiver stick to it.  A child is less likely to try and manipulate a caregiver into changing the limits when their experience has been that there’s no bending on the limits.   And remember, you are the one who sets the limits and lays down the law.  There’s no need to argue with your child.  Be firm and consistent and they are less likely to challenge the rules and will accept the consequences.


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