child development, Child's Education, Relationships

Is Your Toddler Ready for Responsibilities?

When is your child ready to take on any responsibility? When is she old enough to have a particular task?

Responsibility is a good virtue to pass onto our children. It is something that they could learn not just in theory but also in practice. We cannot always just speak with them about do’s and don’ts without letting them do what they are supposed to do and avoid what they should not be doing.

But why should you teach them responsibility?

1. Responsibility is a virtue.

As a virtue, responsibility will give your child a foundation for dealing with other people and her environment. It will allow her to understand that the world does not revolve around her but that she must contribute something to make the world, or even just your house, a better place.

2. Responsibility secures their future.

If you are deeply concerned about the career path of your child in the future, then better instill responsibility early on. Although responsibility in itself won’t directly offer a response to what your child should be taking as a college course or what job to pursue, it will give her a definite advantage to secure a bright and wonderful future.

Once your child learns about responsibility, there is no need to nag her about finishing her homework. Once she understands that the world does not revolve around her, she will be more considerate of other people in the workplace. Once she becomes responsible, she can stand independently and traverse the road to success.

3. Responsibility corrects unwanted behavior.

Learning about responsibility in theory and practice can cause a fascinating transformation in the attitude of your child.

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I know how tempting it is to give her all the comfort in life and to shield her from all harm. But at some point in child’s life, difficulties and challenges will be inevitable. A well-grounded child could have a better chance for survival than a spoiled child in the real world.

How do you know if your child is ready for responsibilities?

There is no definite timetable for teaching responsibilities. Even babies can make a sense out of this world simply by observing.

If you want to teach your toddler about responsibility, then show her what it means. It is by seeing your daily behavior that she can learn most.

Here are some of the daily household chores that your toddler can do according to her age:

  • Putting Toys Away

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Scattered toys are almost always a problem for most parents. Why don’t you solve this problem by making it as a fun activity?

Have a nursery rhyme for packing away the toys. Replace the lyrics with words that mean what you want to happen. You will be surprised how organized your house can be once your toddler learns about this skill.

  • Putting Clothes in the Hamper

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Folding clothes and dropping them in a hanger can also take up much of your time. Instead of whining over your pile of clothes, get the help from your toddler by asking her to put some of the clothes in the hanger. She would surely love this task!

 

  • Wiping Dirt from Her Face

The responsibility to oneself is a critical value that a person must learn. Hygiene can easily be taught once your child reaches the toddler stage.

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One simple task that you can give your toddler is wiping her face during meal times. Let her know that dirt must not stay on her face.

  • Piling Up Books

Do you love reading to your child? Then give your toddler the responsibility to keep the books orderly. It could also develop her motor skills, actually!

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Teaching responsibility to your toddler is super fun. Just be creative in your ways and you are surely on your way to having a truly responsible child with a great chance for success in the future!


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child development

Take the Bite out of your Toddler’s Biting Problem

Mother with her daughter

The majority of toddlers engage in some biting between their first and third birthdays. Probably the most common reason is that it is one of the few ways of communicating that’s effective for them, before verbal skills are developed. However, not all children bite. Some choose other forms of communication, such as grabbing, shoving, or punching.

Another reason toddlers bite is to express frustration, a feeling which is very common with toddlers, because both their communication skills and their motor skills are so limited.

To a young toddler it can be funny to see mommy suddenly bolt upright or for a playmate to start crying. Toddlers may also bite because they’re teething or because they put everything in their mouths anyway, so why not someone’s arm? It could even be something as simple as hunger.

But how do you teach your child not to bite?

Make it perfectly clear that the biting is hurtful and wrong and point out to your child how much pain their biting has caused.  Express that biting is wrong and unacceptable and that neither mommy or daddy like it. 

If you discover that your child is biting out of frustration, try giving them an alternative to express to people they are having a difficult time.  Though language is a difficult task at this age, most toddlers can be taught words that are appropriate for such a situation.  For instance, “You need to tell mommy or daddy that you need help and not bite us,” or “Show mommy what you need, but don’t bite.  You’ll hurt her if you bite and I know you don’t want to hurt mommy, do you?”

Experts agree that parents should try not to give biting so much attention that it becomes an attention-getter. This is true of all behavior that you don’t want to see repeated.  Firmly tell the child again that there is no biting allowed, that it is wrong, and that it hurts people.